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Legal Considerations for At Home Care Planning

Being informed and organized are the best ways to prepare for at home care services

When you start the conversation about at home care with your senior loved one, it might be a good idea to discuss legal matters as well. To respect your loved one’s wishes regarding the future, it is important to make sure that all their legal affairs are in perfect order.

The first topic you might want to initiate is whether your loved one has made a living will and appointed a durable power of attorney. At home care experts point out that having advance directives such as these can allow your loved one to make decisions about the type of care they want to receive later in life. A living will can provide detailed care instructions whereas a durable power of attorney enables family members to make care-related decisions in case the loved one cannot decide for themselves.

In case the individual has not made their wishes clear in a legal document, a court can appoint a guardian or conservator after the person becomes incapacitated. A guardian can make various types of decisions on behalf of the individual, including the type of care they will receive, where they will live, and what treatments they can receive. A conservator, on the other hand, can make financial decisions instead of the individual. Family members or other parties can also petition the court to appoint a guardian or conservator.

At home care experts advise seniors to make wills too. Wills allow people to decide who gets personal assets after they pass on. In addition to giving seniors peace of mind that they have taken care of their affairs on time, having a will can prevent many problems and conflicts that may otherwise arise among family members. Your loved one may also want to consider setting a living trust.

Finally, senior at home care professionals recommend that seniors collect all their legal documents and important information in one place. That way, family members can properly react in case of unexpected situations and emergencies. Some of the documents your loved one may want to organize include medical history, tax returns, social security records, insurance information, funeral prearrangements, mortgage papers, assets, etc. Additionally, reliable family members should keep a copy of the will, trust documents, and advance directives.

Keep in mind that the above-mentioned guidelines are for reference purposes only, meaning that your loved one should talk to their lawyer regarding legal matters.

If you need assistance with legal considerations and other preparations for at home care, please contact Comfort Keepers today at (303) 309-2759. We are happy to offer advice.

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